Point of View—What IS It? How to Find the Perfect Voice for YOUR Story

This is one of the best explanations of who is actually telling your story–right up there with Orson Scott Card’s “Characters and Viewpoints.”

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Geiko Caveman. Geiko Caveman.

Monday, we talked about the Three Acts of a Writer’s Journey. The first hint we might be tipping into The Apprentice Phase is we hear the word P.O.V. and panic. What is THAT? Prisoners of Vietnam? Pets of Vegans? Pals of Viagra?

We ALL know writing a novel is FAR from easy. We just make it look that way 😉 .

Today, I’m putting on my editor’s hat. Many of you decided to become writers because you love to write. Duh. I’ll even bet most of you, back when you were in school, also made very good grades in English. Thus, you might assume that you naturally know how to write a novel that is fit for successful publication.

Maybe you do. But, if you are anything like me when I started out? You might not know as much as you think you do.

Why?

Our high…

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18 Books To Read by 18

Josh Mosey | Writer

A friend recently asked me for some book recommendations for her teenage son. She was thinking about C. S. Lewis’ Space Trilogy (which I recommended highly) but wanted some other titles as well.

“What books did you read–or wish you had read–in your teenage years?” she asked me.

“Great question,” I said.

Many of the books came from my AP Literature class. Others came from classes I attended in college. Still others as recommendations from friends. I consider them indispensable to my current reading preferences, my writing style, and my worldview in general.

In order to avoid placing importance to the order, they are presented alphabetically by the author’s last name.

  1. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov9780802130112
  2. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  3. Myths of the Norsemen by Roger Lancelyn Green
  4. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  5. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  6. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  7. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper…

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Can You Solve the Sphinx’s Other Riddle?

Interesting Literature

One of the most celebrated tragedies of ancient Greece was Oedipus Rex, Sophocles’ play about the Theban king who unwittingly killed his father and married his mother. In order to become King of Thebes, Oedipus had had to solve a famous riddle – or should that be riddles?

Oedipus was born to King Laius and Queen Jocasta of Thebes, but when Laius hears a prophecy that he will die at the hands of his son, he orders the child to be killed. The infant is left on a mountain to die, but a shepherd finds him and takes him in, raising him as his own son and naming him Oedipus (literally ‘swollen feet’, from the pins that had bound the infant’s feet together when he was found). When he grows up in Corinth, Oedipus learns of the prophecy that he will kill his father and marry his mother…

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Want More Conflict in Your Novel? Go DM & Balance the Party

Unique ideas on adding dimensions to characters–simple too.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 8.20.24 AM

Recently, I’ve added homeschooling The Spawn to the list of what I already do. Blog, write books, teach, run two small businesses and keeping a house clean, the yard mowed, and my family fed. As an introvert who works from home, it’s easy to realize you no longer leave the house and are talking to yourself way more than is healthy. Thus, I’ve been on a mission to break some patterns and do what might scare me (talking to other people in person).

Btw, writers don’t count.

Welcome to Nerd Land

In the spirit of this “Doing Stuff Differently” I joined some friends for a monthly game of Dungeons and Dragons, and took Hubby as a hostage teammate. I hadn’t played D&D since I was in high school so there is a learning curve. But one thing that struck me is how being an author had changed my perspective. The…

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10 Facts You Don’t Know About The Lord of the Rings

101 Books

Between Tolkien’s immense novel and Peter Jackson’s incredible adaptation, The Lord of the Rings has more interesting little tidbits than every novel I’ve read from the list combined.

I found this exhaustive list of “facts you never knew” on Empire Online, so I thought I’d share 10 of my favorites with you.

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Writing Block — Cure #1

Writer's Block 1

Setting the atmosphere

If you’re like many people, you have trouble focusing when you sit in front of your computer in the stillness of the morning as your mind wanders and you doze off… again. (Or are startled awake by the begging of the children to come play.) You stare at the screen again and hate the pathetic feeling of inadequacy as you realize yet again that your attempt at writing does not even meet your standards, let alone that of the novels written by authors you secretly dream of readers comparing you with.

In this depression, you lack the words to describe the epic-ness you know your story could hold. How do you get in the mood for the scene? How do you set the atmosphere for it?

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Susan Cain announces news to make introverts happy

I wish this had been around when I was younger. I believe we introverts have many strengths because we pay attention to areas that extroverts ignore. This can make us better leaders, speakers, and friends than others if we adapt the so called weaknesses into our strengths.

TED Blog

Susan Cain spoke about the power of introverts at TED2012. Hear her plans for making the world a little quieter for them. Photo: James Duncan Davidson Susan Cain spoke about the power of introverts at TED2012. Hear her plans for making the world a little quieter for them. Photo: James Duncan Davidson

Susan Cain is planning a Quiet Revolution. In her classic talk from TED2012, she spoke up for introverts, pointing out the many ways our culture encourages extroversion. “I wasn’t prepared for the intensity and voracity of response to these ideas,” Cain tells the TED Blog two years later. “There’s an enormous hunger for recognition, understanding and advancement.”

In her talk during All-Stars session 5 at TED2014 just now, Cain shared how she plans to empower introverts—for the benefit of us all—by creating quiet places at work, training quiet leaders, and empowering introverts in the classroom. The TED Blog caught up with Cain to learn more about the details of the movement that she didn’t have time to share in her short talk. Along…

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