True or False: Braveheart

220px-Braveheart_imp

Braveheart.

One of the few movies (in my opinion) that far outdid the book. It masterfully balances the love story with adventure and revenge. A perfect movie to watch with your significant other. (Then again, in the case of my wife, it is too violent because the horses get hurt!)

 

1. True or False—Wallace came from a family of commoners.

2. True or False—Wallace invented the use of pikes (long spears) in order to defend against cavalry.

3. True or False—English soldiers wore uniforms.

4. True or False—Scots painted their faces for battle.

5. True or False—Wallace spoke French.

(Answers at bottom)

Check out the following websites for more information:

http://thehande.wordpress.com/2011/12/05/braveheart-the-10-historical-inaccuracies-you-need-to-know-before-watching-the-movie/

http://www.celticfringe.net/history/brave.htm

 

 

 

Answers:

1. Unknown—most scholars think his father was a knight, though the movie has the possibility of being true in this aspect. This is one of the perks of telling about a man we actually know so little about.

2. False—pikes had been around for centuries, especially used by the Greek phalanxes. They were the major fighting force long before cavalry.

3. False—this is necessary in a movie, though, to help the viewer know who is who. In actuality, soldiers often painted their shields with their symbol, but most of the clothing would have been the same on either side. I imagine this must have made fighting confusing.

4. False—earlier Picts and Celts were known to do this, but at this time, it was not common. But it sure adds to Wallace’s image.

5. True—in fact, French was common. It was the language of the educated, whereas English was looked down upon. Quite a change nowadays!

 

In all, the movie is true in that Wallace led a rebellion against the English and was executed. But doesn’t the fiction make the story so much more appealing?

Then again, if historical fact is important to you, you may prefer novels to movies.

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